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Film Data
Living  2021
Director:  Oliver Hermanus
Producer:
  Stephen Woolley and Elizabeth Karlsen
Art Director:
  Adam Marshall (supervisor)
Editor:
  Chris Wyatt
Music:
  Emilie Levienaise-Farrouch
Screenplay:
  Kazou Ishiguro, based on the 1952 film Ikiru, written and directed by Akira Kurosawa
Director of Photography:
  Jamie Ramsay
image 1
Cast:
people1 Bill Nighy
spacer1 Aimee Lou Wood
spacer1 Alex Sharp
spacer1 Tom Burke
spacer1 Adrian Rawlings
spacer1 Oliver Chris
spacer1 Hubert Burton
spacer1 Michael Cochrane
spacer1 Lia Williams
spacer1 Zoe Boyle
spacer1 Jessica Flood
spacer1 Celeste Dodwell
people1 Bill Nighy spacer1 Aimee Lou Wood spacer1 Alex Sharp
spacer1 Tom Burke spacer1 Adrian Rawlings spacer1 Oliver Chris
spacer1 Hubert Burton spacer1 Michael Cochrane spacer1 Lia Williams
spacer1 Zoe Boyle spacer1 Jessica Flood spacer1 Celeste Dodwell
people1 Bill Nighy spacer1 Aimee Lou Wood
spacer1 Alex Sharp spacer1 Tom Burke
spacer1 Adrian Rawlings spacer1 Oliver Chris
spacer1 Hubert Burton spacer1 Michael Cochrane
spacer1 Lia Williams spacer1 Zoe Boyle
spacer1 Jessica Flood spacer1 Celeste Dodwell

Synopsis:
A veteran civil servant and bureaucratic cog in the rebuilding of Britain post-WWII, Williams (Bill Nighy) expertly pushes paperwork around a government office only to reckon with his existence when he’s diagnosed with a fatal illness. A widower, he conceals the condition from his grown son, spends an evening of debauchery with a bohemian writer in Brighton, and uncharacteristically avoids his office. But after a vivacious former co-worker, Margaret, inspires him to find meaning in his remaining days, Williams attempts to salvage a modest building project from bureaucratic purgatory.

Director Oliver Hermanus (Beauty) offers a poignant reimagining of Akira Kurosawa’s masterpiece, Ikiru (To Live). Nobel and Booker Prize–winning author Kazuo Ishiguro’s adaptation elegantly transposes the story’s profound humanism to postwar London. Free of false sentimentality and tragic intonations, Living finds its soul in the wistful dignity Nighy brings to Williams. Transcending its period setting, Living is a timely reflection on the compulsions and distractions that obscure what it means to live.

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